DC Attorneys Oppose Legal Services Cut, But Some Don’t Want To Chip In

Yesterday’s Washington Post reports on a breakfast meeting DC Councilmember Michael Brown hosted to discuss the proposed new income tax brackets with residents who would be affected. Also to give them a clearer view of what the tax reform would mean for them personally.

Another aim, it seems, was to test the notion that wealthy residents would flee to the suburbs if their taxes increases. The Post article indicates that some of Brown’s guests debunked it. But “younger residents–mostly attorneys–were opposed” to the tax increase.

Meanwhile, more than half the practice sessions of the D.C. Bar have issued a public statement calling on the Council to reject the proposed cut in funding for the Access to Justice Program.

This is the program that provides free legal services for low-income District residents. It also supports a bank of interpreters for those who aren’t fluent in English and/or have a hearing disability. And it helps attorneys employed by nonprofit legal services organizations pay off their student loans, thus enabling them to work for relatively little pay.

Mayor Fenty has proposed a $1.8 million cut for the program–this on top of the $700,000 cut for the current fiscal year. Together, these would leave the program with only half the D.C. funds it had in 2009.

As I’ve written before, local legal services organizations have been hard hit by reduced funding from other sources. They’ve cut back on both full-time attorneys and staff that support the quantity and quality of legal services they provide. This at a time when even more people need their help.

So the attorneys in a broad spectrum of the D.C. Bar sections understandably want at least level-funding for the Access to Justice Program. Where do the attorneys who oppose a tax increase think the money’s going to come from?

Or maybe I’m seeing a paradox where none exists. Perhaps the up-and-comers at Brown’s breakfast voted against the Bar’s statement, feeling that a couple of hundred dollars of their handsome incomes were more important than equal access to justice.

Fortunately, there are partners at a number of our biggest law firms who are ready to invest in D.C. If you’re a lawyer, you can join your voice to theirs.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s