Baucus Health Care Reform Bill Needs Reform

I told myself I was going to leave health care reform to more expert bloggers. But I’ve changed my mind because the bill Senator Baucus has introduced would compromise away vital interests of poor and near-poor individuals and families. Several provisions are at issue here.

One is the scheme for subsidizing the health insurance premiums they’d pay. It’s pretty complicated, but essentially involves a sliding scale for offsetting the costs of premiums for individuals and families up to 400% of the federal poverty line.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has crunched the numbers. Its analysis shows that the required premium contributions would be more than many low-income people could afford–and much greater than the contributions that would be required under either the bill pending in the House of Representatives or the bill produced by the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee.

But that’s only part of it. At the end of the first year, the caps on contributions would shift from a fixed percent of income to a fixed percent of the cost of the insurance premium. So low-income people would wind up paying an ever-greater share of their income for insurance because premiums will almost certainly rise faster than incomes.

And that’s still only part of it. The Baucus bill would mean high out-of-pocket costs for low-income people. Essentially, this has to do with the actuarial values the bill assigns to the various levels of insurance that would be available. The higher the actuarial value, the lower the deductibles and co-pays. People in the lowest income bracket would be entitled to the plan with the highest actuarial value, people in the next-lowest bracket to the plan with the next-highest actuarial value, etc.

So far, so good. But the Baucus bill sets actuarial values lower than either the House or the Senate HELP Committee bill. This translates into higher out-of-pockets. According to CBPP, if the plan were in effect now, a family of three at 250% of the federal poverty line would have to pay 12.6% of its income for deductibles and co-pays before assistance kicked in. And that’s in addition to the 10.5% of its income it would have to pay for the insurance premium. Affordable health care this ain’t.

Last, but far from least, the Baucus bill egregiously limits the “pay or play” scheme that’s a standard element in many health care reform proposals, including the House bill and the HELP Committee bill. Washington Post blogger Ezra Klein calls this “the worst policy in the bill, and perhaps in the world.” Here’s why.

Under the Baucus bill, employers that don’t provide health insurance would have to cover the costs of the subsidies that most of their eligible workers would receive when they purchased health insurance. Employers that do provide health insurance would also have to cover the costs of subsidies for those of their workers who had to pay more than 13% of their income for the premiums in the employer-sponsored plan. But employers would get a “free rider,” i.e., incur no cost at all, for the rest of their workers.

So there’s an incentive here to hire workers whose family income puts them above the subsidy level and workers covered under a family’s insurance plan. And there’s a big disincentive to hire low-income workers entitled to subsidized family plans since these, of course, cost more than individual plans.

Why hire a single mother who’s struggling to support her children when it’s cheaper to hire a well-off teenager–or one of those illegal immigrants who’ve become a favorite talking point for the Republican opposition?

As New York Times columnist Paul Krugman says, we’ve known for a long time that any health care bill that Congress produces will fall short of reformers’ hopes. The question is how bad does a bill have to be to make it too bad to vote for.

The Baucus bill is right on the threshold. It would be a dreadful shame to wind up with a plan that left low-income individuals and families with unaffordable health care costs–plus new challenges to employment. But would it be better to scrap the whole thing if that would leave us with the grossly inequitable, unsustainable system we’ve got?

Perhaps there’s still hope for a bill that won’t force this choice.

2 Responses to Baucus Health Care Reform Bill Needs Reform

  1. […] the lack of a public option and prospective cutbacks in Medicare. The committee failed to resolve two major problems in the Baucus bill that would adversely affect low-income people. In fact, it made at least one of […]

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